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Friday, March 11, 2005

Law? Law No More 

The press, for a change, raises a mild ruckus about the administration's patently illegal policy of "extraordinary rendition" (the bureaucratic euphemism for outsourcing the dirty job of torture to other, theoretically less enlightened countries). The Pentagon's response? Ramp up the program by exporting half of the detainees in Gitmo to our allies in the Axis of S&M. From Tim Grieve of Salon's "War Room":
In June, the Supreme Court, on a 6-3 vote, rejected the administration's claim that detainees had no rights to challenge their treatment in U.S. courts. And in January, U.S. District Court Joyce Hens Green held that foreign nationals detained at Guantanamo have a constitutional right to due process that is being denied them by the military tribunal system the Pentagon has established. That decision is now before the U.S. Court of Appeals, where the administration will argue that granting due process rights to detainees will interfere with military decision-making.

As the administration comes to terms with the fact that it hasn't gamed the system quite as well as it thought it had, Pentagon planners are working hard to come up with another way to keep detainees -- and the stories they might tell about the conditions of their confinement -- out of U.S. courts. According to today's
New York Times, the Pentagon is asking the State Department to help it ship hundreds of Guantanamo detainees to Saudi Arabia, Yemen and Afghanistan.

It's like rendition, only on a massive scale.
We're all for the massive relocation program if it means we can stop reading torture tales. We have a hard enough time sleeping at night knowing our taxes are paying for things like this:
A boy no older than 11 was among the children held by the Army at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison, the former U.S. commander of the facility told a general investigating abuses at the prison.
Brigadier General Janis Karpinski hastened to add, however, that American forces did not behead a single prisoner under the age of sixteen. To the best of her knowledge.

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